Holy Week Blog 2015, Saturday: What Do We Do On “Saturday?” AKA: What do you do when you don’t know what to do?

Matthew 27:57-66 NRSV:

57 When it was evening, there came a rich man from Arimathea, named Joseph, who was also a disciple of Jesus. 58 He went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus; then Pilate ordered it to be given to him. 59 So Joseph took the body and wrapped it in a clean linen cloth 60 and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn in the rock. He then rolled a great stone to the door of the tomb and went away. 61 Mary Magdalene and the other Mary were there, sitting opposite the tomb.

62 The next day, that is, after the day of Preparation, the chief priests and the Pharisees gathered before Pilate 63 and said, “Sir, we remember what that impostor said while he was still alive, ‘After three days I will rise again.’64 Therefore command the tomb to be made secure until the third day; otherwise his disciples may go and steal him away, and tell the people, ‘He has been raised from the dead,’ and the last deception would be worse than the first.” 65 Pilate said to them, “You have a guard[t] of soldiers; go, make it as secure as you can.”[u] 66 So they went with the guard and made the tomb secure by sealing the stone.

I’ve seen a lot of Easter stuff in the news this week. Lots of Egg Drops, Easter Egg Hunts etc. Rural King selling baby Chickens. Lots of candy going out. Lots of celebrations. Some stuff about Holy Week, but not a lot.

Here’s my question: What do you do on Saturday?

In this passage, lots of people did something on Saturday:

  • A rich man named Joseph honored Jesus.
  • John’s Gospel has Nicodemus providing about 100lbs of spices to prepare Jesus’ body for burial.
  • Pharisees gathered before Pilate to cover their trails and hedge their bets a little.
  • Pilate continues to placate them, hoping this whole thing will just go away.

See, Saturday wasn’t a good day for Jesus or his disciples, and that’s what I want us to wrap our minds around tonight. It was terrible, hopeless etc.

What do you do on Saturday? When things are hopeless? When the Resurrection and all its life and hope seem a million miles away? What do you do when you don’t know what to do, and it doesn’t seem like God is speaking? “Saturday” can really stink. And if we blast through Holy Week doing Easter stuff, we will miss what Saturday has to teach us.

Then you’ve got the two Mary’s… What did THEY do on Saturday?

They waited. At the tomb. It’s almost like they’re waiting for something to happen.

And it does…

SO what do we do on Saturday?

We wait. And waiting is hard.

We trust, even when trusting is hard.

We worship, bringing our pain and suffering to God anyway.

We remember the first Saturday, when all hope was gone. And we remember that Saturday gave way to Sunday. We benefit from the perspective we’ve been given because of when we live. We know what the disciples didn’t. We know Resurrection is coming. And so with Mary and the other Mary, we wait at the tomb… anticipating something miraculous even if all hope seems lost.


Blessings,

Mark

Advertisements

Holy Week Blog 2015, Wednesday: When His Heart was Troubled

John 12:27-36, NRSV

27 “Now my soul is troubled. And what should I say—‘Father, save me from this hour’? No, it is for this reason that I have come to this hour. 28 Father, glorify your name.” Then a voice came from heaven, “I have glorified it, and I will glorify it again.” 29 The crowd standing there heard it and said that it was thunder. Others said, “An angel has spoken to him.” 30 Jesus answered, “This voice has come for your sake, not for mine. 31 Now is the judgment of this world; now the ruler of this world will be driven out. 32 And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people[e] to myself.” 33 He said this to indicate the kind of death he was to die. 34 The crowd answered him, “We have heard from the law that the Messiah[f] remains forever. How can you say that the Son of Man must be lifted up? Who is this Son of Man?” 35 Jesus said to them, “The light is with you for a little longer. Walk while you have the light, so that the darkness may not overtake you. If you walk in the darkness, you do not know where you are going. 36 While you have the light, believe in the light, so that you may become children of light.”


It had to be discouraging for Him. He taught them, did miracles among them, explained it seemingly every way he could, and still they didn’t really believe. He was facing the cross, and in a few short days all of them would forsake Him, and he knew it. And still He trusted. Still His prayer was for the Father to be glorified in Him– even (and especially) in His death. Still He’s drawing them to believe.

It’s impossible for us to really understand where Jesus is coming from here in this passage. All I think I can really say is that I’m reminded of what Romans says when it calls us to have the faith of Jesus… even (and especially) when we face trouble.

So.

Lord God, I pray for the faith of your Son. I pray when we face troubles, you would grow something in us that’s like Jesus. I pray that your name would be glorified in our lives. I pray for perspective, that you would show us a little bit of the bigger picture, so our light and momentary troubles could be seen as just that. I pray for the light, that you would indeed light our way forward. In the name of your Son, by the presence of the Spirit I pray.

Amen.

Blessings,

Mark

Holy Week Blog, Monday: Power that corrupts.

John 12:1-12 NRSV:

Six days before the Passover Jesus came to Bethany, the home of Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead. There they gave a dinner for him. Martha served, and Lazarus was one of those at the table with him. Mary took a pound of costly perfume made of pure nard, anointed Jesus’ feet, and wiped them[a] with her hair. The house was filled with the fragrance of the perfume.But Judas Iscariot, one of his disciples (the one who was about to betray him), said, “Why was this perfume not sold for three hundred denarii[b] and the money given to the poor?” (He said this not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief; he kept the common purse and used to steal what was put into it.) Jesus said, “Leave her alone. She bought it[c] so that she might keep it for the day of my burial. You always have the poor with you, but you do not always have me.”

When the great crowd of the Jews learned that he was there, they came not only because of Jesus but also to see Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead. 10 So the chief priests planned to put Lazarus to death as well, 11 since it was on account of him that many of the Jews were deserting and were believing in Jesus.


I think one of the important things happening in the Gospel of John is the power dynamic at play. Time and again the Jewish religious leaders try to assert their power over Jesus. It’s a power they’re used to wielding. If they decided to put someone out of the synagogue, they were out. If they wanted someone stoned to death, it usually happened. In this passage, they conspire to murder Lazarus because Lazarus as a living, breathing miracle of Jesus was eroding their power base.  If the Jews’ religious power disintegrated because of Jesus, they are left with nothing. They are the big kids on the block, and when their power is threatened, they seem unwilling to stop short of anything– even premeditated murder– to eliminate the threat.

I guess my response to this is something like a warning to leaders in the church to be aware and very careful how we use power. Power really does tend to corrupt, and religious power is pretty potent stuff among religious people. So be careful. Be careful not to hold too tightly to the little kingdoms we build. Be careful, lest we do the wrong thing when the Real Kingdom comes and threatens our power… because it will threaten our power. In those moments, remember it’s not about you. (Nor is it about me, either.) If the Kingdom of Jesus means I lose my position as the big cheese (and make no bones about it— that’s precisely what it means.) then so be it. Come, Lord Jesus

Blessings,

Mark

LentBlog 2015, Day 40: Towards Outsiders…

Colossians 4:2-6, NRSV:

Devote yourselves to prayer, keeping alert in it with thanksgiving. At the same time pray for us as well that God will open to us a door for the word, that we may declare the mystery of Christ, for which I am in prison, so that I may reveal it clearly, as I should.

Conduct yourselves wisely toward outsiders, making the most of the time.[a]Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how you ought to answer everyone.


We live in the great State of Indiana. I like Indiana. I grew up here, and being back in the state after 16+ years away is in some ways like putting on an old, well-fitting T-shirt. In some other ways, though, it’s also like a bad Twilight Zone trip.

This week, the Indiana governor signed a bill into law that supposedly promotes something like “religious freedom.” Lots of right-wing, politically conservative Christians are celebrating in the streets, touting a major victory. Lots of centrist and left-wing, politically liberal Christians are shouting just as loudly, claiming this new law is a license to discriminate.

I’m left shaking my head. My non-Christian friends are taking to their Facebook walls and Twitter accounts  pointing out that we all look like a bunch of idiots.

I haven’t read the whole law. I know I need to. We celebrated Sabbath today and did a sum-total of not much around the house.

But here’s the deal for me tonight: this passage from Colossians calls us to:

Conduct yourselves wisely toward outsiders, making the most of the time.[a]Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how you ought to answer everyone.

Conduct yourselves wisely towards outsiders. Towards folks not yet in the faith. Towards folks who might not believe God even exists, let alone that Jesus is the savior. Towards folks who live as if they haven’t met Jesus, not forgetting that some folks in the church act as if they haven’t met Jesus.

Let your speech be gracious to them. Now repeat that. LET YOUR SPEECH BE GRACIOUS TO THEM.

Folks, in the midst of Facebook wars, boycott threats, and “religious freedom” acts, could we please… like, pretty please with sugar on top… stop trying to win some culture war and start seeing people with Kingdom eyes? PLEASE? 

It seems to me the role of the Kingdom in this world is not to defend my rights. It seems to me we’ve got far too much work to do living-out prevenient grace to spend too much time worrying about such things. Because here’s the thing: as Christians called to live out a Kingdom ethic, we will not agree with the lifestyle choices many people make. It happens. But our speech, our attitudes, our politics, and for Pete’s sake our Tweets and Facebook posts can and must be gracious. And if that means someone infringes my “rights” every so often, so be it. We’ve got bigger fish to fry and a much more redemptive calling.

Blessings,

Mark

LentBlog 2015, Day 39

Colossians 3:12-17 NRSV:

12 As God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience. 13 Bear with one another and, if anyone has a complaint against another, forgive each other; just as the Lord[f]has forgiven you, so you also must forgive. 14 Above all, clothe yourselves with love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony. 15 And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in the one body. And be thankful. 16 Let the word of Christ[g] dwell in you richly; teach and admonish one another in all wisdom; and with gratitude in your hearts sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to God.[h] 17 And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.


Honestly, y’all, its been a long, challenging day. This passage is speaking to me profoundly, but my responses are probably, at least for tonight, best left not splattered all over an internet blog.  I think I’ll leave it at that and bid you goodnight!

Blessings,

Mark

LentBlog 2015, Day 38: Truth-Telling As a Core Value.

Colossians 3:1-9, NRSV

 So if you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth, for you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ who is your[a] life is revealed, then you also will be revealed with him in glory.

Put to death, therefore, whatever in you is earthly: fornication, impurity, passion, evil desire, and greed (which is idolatry). On account of these the wrath of God is coming on those who are disobedient.[b] These are the ways you also once followed, when you were living that life.[c] But now you must get rid of all such things—anger, wrath, malice, slander, and abusive[d]language from your mouth. Do not lie to one another, seeing that you have stripped off the old self with its practices 10 and have clothed yourselves with the new self, which is being renewed in knowledge according to the image of its creator. 11 In that renewal[e] there is no longer Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave and free; but Christ is all and in all!


“Do not lie to one another, seeing that you have stripped off the old self and all of its practices.”

Been thinking about this one a lot lately. Stefanie and I are planting a church in the Muncie, IN area. Part of working out what this new congregation might look like is developing a list of core values (or something). I’ve gotta say, we’ve come to the place in our lives of ministry that we are pretty solidly set on “truth telling” as core value #2. “Being Christian” (whatever that means) is core value #1. But #2 is “Being Honest.”

We intend to tell the truth:

  • to each other
  • about each other
  • about God
  • to God
  • to ourselves.

A good friend of mine said to me last week, “a good way to avoid answers you don’t want to hear is to avoid asking the question.” He’s right… and he wasn’t suggesting that as a healthy course of action… but such practices reek of dishonesty. It seems the way of discipleship is paved with honesty. Confession… grace… love… healthy relationships with God and people… healthy conflict resolution… all of those things can’t really happen the way they’re intended without honesty being in the picture in a big way.

I think a lot of good folks are living-out lies. I think maybe because the truth sometimes hurts. Sometimes acknowledging the truth will prompt changes we aren’t comfortable with or think we’re ready for. So it’s easier to avoid or bury the truth, give in to fear, and avoid the necessary, perhaps painful change.

But it’s better, especially as leaders, to face a painful truth head-on than avoid it and continue living a collective untruth.

Blessings all…

Mark

LentBlog 2015, Day 37: The Heart of the Matter

Colossians 2:16-23

16 Therefore do not let anyone condemn you in matters of food and drink or of observing festivals, new moons, or sabbaths. 17 These are only a shadow of what is to come, but the substance belongs to Christ. 18 Do not let anyone disqualify you, insisting on self-abasement and worship of angels, dwelling on visions, puffed up without cause by a human way of thinking,19 and not holding fast to the head, from whom the whole body, nourished and held together by its ligaments and sinews, grows with a growth that is from God.

20 If with Christ you died to the elemental spirits of the universe, why do you live as if you still belonged to the world? Why do you submit to regulations, 21 “Do not handle, Do not taste, Do not touch”? 22 All these regulations refer to things that perish with use; they are simply human commands and teachings. 23 These have indeed an appearance of wisdom in promoting self-imposed piety, humility, and severe treatment of the body, but they are of no value in checking self-indulgence.


Short and to-the-point tonight, I think. I’m pretty tired and I’m fresh out of anything that resembles eloquence at this point.

It seems as though these regulations Paul is going after here are ways of sort-of imposing righteousness from the outside-in. It’s like if someone could be forced to comply with certain kinds of behaviors– observing the rules Paul mentions– they could somehow become Godly. Such things have the appearance of self-imposed piety, but in reality they aren’t of any value to check self-indulgence. Instead, the general motion of discipleship seems here to be living-out instead of imposing. One’s heart and mind are changed, and then one lives out, towards the Head. It seems from this passage Paul says we can be doing all sorts of holy-looking stuff, but not really be transformed. The transformation comes by grace through faith. Then faith becomes faith-in-action, lived out, instead of imposed from the outside.

At least that’s what crosses my mind reading this passage.

Blessings,

Mark