Holy Week Blog, Monday: Power that corrupts.

John 12:1-12 NRSV:

Six days before the Passover Jesus came to Bethany, the home of Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead. There they gave a dinner for him. Martha served, and Lazarus was one of those at the table with him. Mary took a pound of costly perfume made of pure nard, anointed Jesus’ feet, and wiped them[a] with her hair. The house was filled with the fragrance of the perfume.But Judas Iscariot, one of his disciples (the one who was about to betray him), said, “Why was this perfume not sold for three hundred denarii[b] and the money given to the poor?” (He said this not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief; he kept the common purse and used to steal what was put into it.) Jesus said, “Leave her alone. She bought it[c] so that she might keep it for the day of my burial. You always have the poor with you, but you do not always have me.”

When the great crowd of the Jews learned that he was there, they came not only because of Jesus but also to see Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead. 10 So the chief priests planned to put Lazarus to death as well, 11 since it was on account of him that many of the Jews were deserting and were believing in Jesus.


I think one of the important things happening in the Gospel of John is the power dynamic at play. Time and again the Jewish religious leaders try to assert their power over Jesus. It’s a power they’re used to wielding. If they decided to put someone out of the synagogue, they were out. If they wanted someone stoned to death, it usually happened. In this passage, they conspire to murder Lazarus because Lazarus as a living, breathing miracle of Jesus was eroding their power base.  If the Jews’ religious power disintegrated because of Jesus, they are left with nothing. They are the big kids on the block, and when their power is threatened, they seem unwilling to stop short of anything– even premeditated murder– to eliminate the threat.

I guess my response to this is something like a warning to leaders in the church to be aware and very careful how we use power. Power really does tend to corrupt, and religious power is pretty potent stuff among religious people. So be careful. Be careful not to hold too tightly to the little kingdoms we build. Be careful, lest we do the wrong thing when the Real Kingdom comes and threatens our power… because it will threaten our power. In those moments, remember it’s not about you. (Nor is it about me, either.) If the Kingdom of Jesus means I lose my position as the big cheese (and make no bones about it— that’s precisely what it means.) then so be it. Come, Lord Jesus

Blessings,

Mark

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