LentBlog 2015, Day 10: Our Need to Win is Killing Us.

11 So then, remember that at one time you Gentiles by birth,[b] called “the uncircumcision” by those who are called “the circumcision”—a physical circumcision made in the flesh by human hands— 12 remember that you were at that time without Christ, being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers to the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world. 13 But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ. 14 For he is our peace; in his flesh he has made both groups into one and has broken down the dividing wall, that is, the hostility between us. 15 He has abolished the law with its commandments and ordinances, that he might create in himself one new humanity in place of the two, thus making peace, 16 and might reconcile both groups to God in one body[c] through the cross, thus putting to death that hostility through it.[d] 17 So he came and proclaimed peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near; 18 for through him both of us have access in one Spirit to the Father. 19 So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are citizens with the saints and also members of the household of God, 20 built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus himself as the cornerstone.[e] 21 In him the whole structure is joined together and grows into a holy temple in the Lord; 22 in whom you also are built together spiritually[f] into a dwelling place for God.

NRSV


I think sometimes our need to win gets us in trouble. In fact, were it not 11:00pm after a long week, and I were to spend some more time really considering that statement, I don’t doubt that I would say something like, “Our need to win has disastrous consequences for us on all kinds of levels.”

It’s the leader who can’t see the obvious failure they’re promoting… because they have to win. Two friends in a disagreement putting their friendship in legitimate jeopardy because the both have to win. A businessman or CEO putting the company at risk with bad decisions… because he/she has to win. A nation that drops bombs on civilians in retaliation for something… because of a need to win.

I’m reading this passage in Ephesians tonight, and the thought crosses my mind again: Jesus brings about reconciliation, in this case between Jewish and Gentile Christians. And he does it all wrong.

See, the way our world tends to resolve conflicts is one party in the conflict eventually proves themselves stronger, more powerful, more numerous, or more cunning, and forces the capitulation of the weaker party.  The weaker party surrenders to the stronger, and a sort of peace can be reached. So if a terrorist bombs you, the way to end terrorism is to bomb them into submission or something. Hence the desire to win.

But God brings about reconciliation in Christ… through his death and resurrection. Reconciliation comes about not through show of force and forcing the weaker party to surrender– God could do that any time God chooses, right?– but through the infinitely stronger and more powerful party humbling himself, taking on the form of a servant, and dying. He wins… by losing. He brings unity… through surrender and humility.

I wonder what would happen if pastors, churches, and people modeled this kind of reconciliation?

Worth thinking about.

Mark

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